THE TAITTIRIYA UPANISHAD

THE TAITTIRIYA UPANISHAD

tWOryaEpnxt

Contributed
by
ALAMELU SWAMINATHAN
and
 C.L.RAMAKRISHNAN


    The   Taittiriya   Upanishad   forms   the   seventh,   eighth   and   ninth   chapters   of   the   Taittiriya Aranyaka   of   the   Krishna   Yajur   Veda.   These   chapters   are   known   as   Siksha   Valli, Ananda   Valli   and   Bhrigu   Valli,   respectively.
 
    The   Siksha   Valli,   which   is   the   first   chapter   of   the   Upanishad   consists   of   twelve   lessons or   Anuvakas   concerning   various   types of   meditations   and   ethical   rules   to   be   practised   by the   seeker   to   make   his   mind   pure   and   fit   to   receive   the   teachings   above   the   Supreme   God contained   in   the   next   two   chapters.   Meditations   of   various   types   are   suggested   to   help   the mind   to   gain   steadiness.   The   thought   of   the   seeker   entangled   in   the   intricate domestic and
religious   rituals   are   lifted   to   the   level   of   cosmic   contemplation.   Material   rewards   are   also promised   as   aids   to   spiritual   evolution.   There   is   prayer   for   prosperity,   good   health, mental efficiency, good   memory,   sweet   speech   and   general   fitness   to   receive   the  bliss of   immortality. The   ethical   principles   and   practices   necessary   for   the   aspirant   are   clearly   stated.   The   tenth lesson   describes   how   the   accomplished   sage   Trisanku narrates his experience of God-realisation.
 
    The   last   lesson   of   the   chapter   repeats   the  opening peace chant
in   a   slightly   altered   form expressing   gratitude   to   the   deities   who   have  helped  the  student   in   realising   the   truths   taught in the chapter.
 
    The   second   chapter,   Ananda   Valli,   declares   that   the   knowledge
of   the   Absolute   God   alone can   destroy   ignorance   and  thus remove   the   misery   of   transmigratory   existence.   He   who   knows Brahman   attains   the   Supreme.   The   all-pervading   Brahman   is   also   man's   inner   most   self   or subtlest   essence   within   the  cavity of   the heart.   But   man   is   not   conscious   of   it   because   the   Self is   covered  or   obscured,   as   it   were,   by   many   layers   of   ignorance   in   the form
of   sheaths   or   Kosas of   varying   degrees   of   subtlety  and  grossness.   These  sheaths  constitute  the   gross,   subtle   and causal   bodies of  man.
 
    The same  Brahman dwells  in  the  hearts   of   all   as   consciousness
and   manifests   itself   in   all   acts   of cognition.   Brahman   is   also   described   as   self-made,   which   means   :   It   is   both   the   material   and   the efficient   cause   of   the   universe.   It   is  cause  of  everything   but   in   Itself   without   a   cause.   It   is   also defined   as   Existence,   Knowledge   and   Infinite   Bliss.   He   who   realises   his   identity with   God   enjoys Supreme   Bliss   compared   to   which   the   happiness   enjoyed   on   earth   and   heaven   are   nothing.
 
    The   third   chapter,   Bhrigu   Valli,   teaches   knowledge  of  Brahman   through   a   dialogue   between teacher   and   disciple.   The   teacher  tells   his   disciple   to   concentrate   all   his   energies   and   inquire into   the   nature   of   the   different   sheaths   to   find   out   if   any   of   them can   be   Brahman   or   God. The   disciple   is   guided   stage   by   stage   through   the   different   Kosas   and   finding   everyone   of   them
falling   short   of   the   ideal,   he   transcends   all   the   Kosas   and   reaches   the   Atman   at   the   innermost   core.
 
    In   the   later   sections   of   this   chapter   are   given   meditations  on   food   as   Brahman.   Food   or   matter   is said   to   be   the  basis of  all   organic   creation,   and   on   the   body,   resulting   from   food,   rests  the   final spiritual   realisation.   The   contemplation   of   food   as   Brahman is   eulogised   in   several   lessons.
    In   conclusion,   it   may   be   said   that   the   Taittriya   Upanishad   contains   many   outstanding   teachings  on   philosophy   and   religious   discipline,   which   deserve   to   be   studied   earnestly   and   meditated
upon   by   all   seekers   of   God.   Even   today   many   persons   learn
the   text   of   this   Upanishad   in   the oral   tradition   in   order to recite   with   the   correct   accent,   measure,   emphasis,  sequence  and rhythm.
PROCEED TO CHAPTER ONE
 RETURN TO THE INDEX OF UPANISHADS